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Friday, April 8th, 2005

Issue 5.13 April 8, 2005

LET’S GO CANADA

U.K. Varsities Register Increase in Foreign Students in ’03-04

ABROAD PERSPECTIVE

Finland Considers Tuition Fees for Foreign Students

OVER THE COUNTER

Australian Universities’ Anti-Plagiarism Drive

GLOBE TIPPING

Bangladesh Travel

LET’S GO CANADA – U.K. Varsities Register Increase in Foreign Students in ’03-04

Figures published by the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA) have revealed that China, Hong Kong and India are important student markets for British universities. In the academic year 2003-04, the number of Chinese students enrolled in degree courses at British universities increased by more than a third to 47,740. In addition to this, 10,575 students from Hong Kong came to the United Kingdom (U.K.) to study. India, which is a popular student market for British institutions sent 14,625 students to Britain the same year, an increase of 2,000 from the previous year. There was also a significant rise, in the number of students from outside the U.K. (including the European Union), of 9%, to 300,055, after a 13.4% increase the previous year, according to the HESA figures.

The statistics do not reflect the downturn in international student numbers in the current academic year as reported by Higher Edge in March 9, 2005. Last month, many British universities reported a drop in applications from international students from countries such as China, Japan, Malaysia, India, Taiwan, Thailand and Singapore. Some institutions even announced that there had been a 50 per cent dip in the numbers of Chinese students taking up new courses in the U.K.

Academic groups such as the Universities UK (UUK) and Campaigning for Mainstream Universities (CMU) have blamed the British Government’s student visa policy for the drop in overseas students. Pam Tatlow, Chief Executive, CMU told Higher Edge, “UK certainly introduced new procedures in the last 18 months in China. These seem to have had the effect of increasing the number of visa refusals – from some parts (but not all) of China. British Universities have taken this issue up with the Government including the Prime Minister. They have been concerned that in some instances, British officials had not given due cognisance to the British Council policy and the fact that students had been admitted to courses at publicly funded British universities.”

Source: “http://www.guardian.co.uk/education/2005/apr/05/highereducation.uk1,” The Guardian, April 5, 2005

ABROAD PERSPECTIVE – Finland Considers Tuition Fees for Foreign Students

Finland’s Ministry of Education has set up a committee to consider the feasibility of introducing tuition fees for non- European Union (EU) and European Economic Area (EEA) students coming to study in Finland. The committee is expected to publish a report on its findings by August 2005. Presently, international students studying in Finland do not pay any tuition fees and Finland may become the second Scandinavian country not providing free higher education. Last year, Denmark announced plans to charge non-EU/EEA students tuition fees from academic year 2006.

Source: “http://www.hs.fi/english/article/1101978728884,” Helsingin Sanomat, March 4, 2005

OVER THE COUNTER – Australian Universities’ Anti-Plagiarism Drive

Australian universities are developing strict policies to deal with cases of plagiarism on campus. The University of Sydney recently investigated more than 200 cases of cheating in the veterinary, health sciences, agriculture, economics and business faculties. Most of the students were asked to resubmit their work.

With instances of cheating, using content from the internet, on the rise, the University’s anti-plagiarism software allows authorities to double check students’ work with material already published on the internet.

Source: “http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2005/mar/22/internationaleducationnews.highereducation,” The Guardian, March 12, 2005

GLOBE TIPPING – Bangladesh Travel

When travelling to Bangladesh, especially areas outside the main cities of Chittagong, Dhaka and Cox’s Bazaar, changing currencies and using credit cards may be difficult. It is safer to have some cash in hand. Generally, the U.S. dollar is the preferred currency. Also, bargaining is prevalent in most places and as a guideline, one can start near half of the price and then negotiate upwards.

Please direct all questions and comments to editor@higher-edge.com
www.higher-edge.com/oov.htm

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