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Wednesday, June 15th, 2005

Issue 6.03 June 15, 2005

LET’S GO CANADA

Regulatory System for Canadian Institutions Imperative

ABROAD PERSPECTIVE

Chinese Students Avoid Foreign Countries

OVER THE COUNTER

New Rules for Foreign Technical Institutes in India: AICTE

LET’S GO CANADA – Regulatory System for Canadian Institutions Imperative

In last week’s issue we covered the value of the Canadian Information Centre for International Credentials (CICIC) list of institutions across Canada. What remains missing however, is a regulatory system homogenized inter-provincially so that it will not be easy to dupe foreigners about the nature or merits of institutions (or, even in some, instances, the duping of visa officers in missions abroad).

Whether motivated by integrity, fairness, or commercial good-sense, the duping of foreigners, spreads ill-will about the Canadian education system. It is true that some notional students are part of the connivance. This dynamic was probably in play some two years ago when immigration officers moved in on a mass arrest, and later deportation, of students who obtained study permits on the strength of admission to a non-operating Ottawa-based institution.

But what of the innocent victims abroad? The provinces must work together so that institutions are not only properly registered, and classified, in a single web-site (such as that of the CICIC) but that they are also, regulated, at least to the minimum necessary to prevent the existence of outright sham and fictional institutions. Perhaps, it is too late to restrict the use of the word “college” in institutional names. But a way must be devised so that consumers abroad, can shop in confidence, without risk that they might be sending money, and themselves or their children, to a fictional
institution.

ABROAD PERSPECTIVE – Chinese Students Avoid Foreign Countries

There has been a significant drop in the numbers of Chinese students applying for higher studies in foreign countries such as the U.S., U.K., Australia and Canada. The single most important reason for the decrease in numbers is perhaps the huge difference between the cost of a foreign degree and the income a foreign-trained graduate can hope to earn back in China.

According to statistics released by the People’s Daily Online, the average annual income of a Chinese family in a medium-sized city is around 80,000 Yuan (around CDN $ 12,135), while a single child studying in Britain will spend 200,000 to 250,000 Yuan (around CDN $ 30,334 to $ 37,920) on education and living expenses. A Chinese student studying in Australia or the United States would be spending between 130,000 Yuan (CDN $ 19,719) and 300,000 Yuan (CDN
$ 45,505), respectively. In contrast to the high cost of overseas qualifications, a student with foreign qualifications without any work experience could expect a monthly income of 2,500 to 4,000 Yuan (CDN $ 379 to $ 607) at the most. In addition to this, the Chinese Government’s policies with regard to higher education were discouraging many students from venturing
abroad. With the Chinese Government revamping the country’s higher education system, more and more Chinese students are now opting to complete their education in China. For those that are looking at overseas qualifications, cost-effective study abroad destinations closer to home, such as Japan, Thailand and Malaysia are preferred.

Concerned about the decrease in applications from Chinese students, universities in the United States and Canada have begun exploring ways to reverse the trend. Several institutes such as University of British Columbia (UBC) and Simon Fraser University in Canada, Northern Arizona University (NAU), Troy University and Ball State University in the U.S. are collaborating with Chinese higher education institutions to deliver their courses to students in China. Strict immigration policies of foreign governments of countries such as Great Britain and the U.S. have also contributed to the decline in Chinese students applying for courses in those countries. The Financial Times reported that Chinese students pursuing undergraduate studies in Britain drastically dropped by 25.8 percent in 2004. A US-commissioned study also found a 32 percent fall in the number of Chinese students opting for graduate studies in the U.S.

Source: “http://english.peopledaily.com.cn/200505/30/eng20050530_187492.html,” People’s Daily Online, May 30, 2005

OVER THE COUNTER – New Rules for Foreign Technical Institutes in India: AICTE

The All India Council for Technical Education (AICTE), India’s apex body for technical education, has drawn up a fresh set of regulations to monitor foreign varsities and prevent the entry of non-accredited institutes into the country. The new rules will replace the earlier mandate issued by the AICTE in April 2003.

Under the new system, foreign varsities and institutions will be treated at par with Indian technical institutions and will be governed by AICTE guidelines. They will not be allowed to appoint franchisees. ‘’Educational innovations, including experimentation with different modes of delivery by a foreign university, shall be allowed, provided such a system is well established either in their parent country or in India,’’ the regulations state on the AICTE website. AICTE will stipulate the fee and the intake for each course to be offered by foreign education providers. AICTE has sought an undertaking from foreign institutions keen on establishing campuses in India declaring that the courses offered to students in India “shall be recognised in the parent country and shall be treated equivalent to the corresponding degrees/ diplomas awarded by the university or institution at home.” This move will safeguard students’ interests by making sure there is no discrimination against Indian students in the curriculum, mode of delivery and examination process. The degrees and diplomas are to have the same nomenclature as in the parent country and any course which will jeopardise national interest will not be allowed. Admissions to foreign institutions, eligibility for admission and conduct of courses will all be governed by the AICTE. Foreign universities interested in setting up shop in India, either directly or through an Indian partner are required to submit a no-objection certificate from the relevant embassy certifying that the institution is accredited by relevant agencies in the home country. Foreign varsities and institutions already operating in India will have to seek fresh approval from AICTE within six months of this directive.

Source: “http://www.aicte-india.org/

Please direct all questions and comments to editor@higher-edge.com
www.higher-edge.com/oov.htm

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