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Wednesday, October 31st, 2007

Issue 9.36; October 31, 2007

Let’s Go Canada

Canada slow in attracting international workforce: CBIE

Abroad Perspective

Russian law on two-tier higher education system

Over The Counter

Malaysian higher education sector to contribute $ 429 million to Government

Globe Tipping

Brushing up on different languages

1) LET’S GO CANADA – Canada slow in attracting international workforce: CBIE

A study released by the Canadian Bureau for International Education (CBIE) has revealed that Canada needs to work harder to successfully retain international students in the country’s workforce. Stiff competition from countries such as United Kingdom, Australia and New Zealand, coupled with problematic internal policies and practices are posing as setbacks to the success of the country’s post graduation work program for foreign students. As a result, Canada has dropped out of the top five preferred study destinations and now ranks 14th in the OECD in terms of percentage of foreign students studying at its institutions.

The report, entitled Northern Lights: International Graduates of Canadian Institutions and the National Workforce has indicated that only a third of international students graduating from Canadian post-secondary institutions plan to stay in Canada to live and work as they anticipate difficulties in getting employment. Another third plan to go home: students from countries such as India and China
say they will get better employment in their own country. Finally, a third plan to study or work in a different country, most frequently the United States.

To help regain its position in the education exports market, and for the employment program to succeed, communication channels need to be opened between stakeholders, including employers, officials, institutions and students themselves. According to Jennifer Humphries, Vice-President, Membership and Scholarships, CBIE: “It is also important to stress that Canada is well positioned to succeed in popularizing the post-graduation work program (PGWP) for a couple of reasons: because it is essentially a good program though it needs improvement and refinement, and because international students and graduates generally like living in Canada – and so would be keen to enter the PGWP with the improvements they recommend!”

2) ABROAD PERSPECTIVE – Russian law on two-tier higher education system

Russian President Vladimir Putin has signed a federal law on a two-tier higher education system, approved by the Russian parliament in mid-October.

Higher-Edge reported on April 4 this year that the Russian government had approved a draft legislation that would
replace the five-year cycle at universities in favor of western-style undergraduate and graduate degrees. Under the new system, effective from September this year, universities will award bachelor degrees after three or four years of study, and master degrees after an additional one or two years.

The move is part of Russia’s efforts to create a unified higher education area in Europe by 2010 as a member nation of the Bologna Process.

Source: “Putin signs law on two-tier higher education system,” Ria Novosti, October 25, 2007

3) OVER THE COUNTER – Malaysian higher education sector to contribute $ 429 million to Government

Education exports will contribute a sum of RM1.5 billion ($ 429 million) to Malaysia’s government coffers, according to official estimates. Nearly 50,000 foreign students are currently enrolled at institutions of higher learning in the country. They spend nearly RM 30,000 ($ 8,576) annually on tuition fees and living expenses. The majority of foreign students are from countries such as Indonesia, China and Bangladesh, and they prefer courses on business, engineering and information technology (IT).

Source: “Higher Education Sector Contributes RM1.5 Bln To Govt This Year,” Bernama, October 28, 2007

4) GLOBE TIPPING – Brushing up on different languages

It is always a good idea to brush up on the local language before travelling to a particular country. You can carry a phrasebook or an electronic translator and show respect and sensitivity towards local cultures. Meeting and greeting business contacts in the native language may enhance the first impression you make and display your willingness to adapt.

If one is unprepared, there are various sources locally that might be of some help. In certain cases, hotels will provide a small pamphlet containing key phrases. As well, some airports give out small local language phrase pamphlets, and some in-flight magazines contain useful phrases.

For common phrases in different languages, visit:
www://simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/ Common_phrases_in_different_languages

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